If life is in danger
call 000

Farming can be a stressful occupation, especially during times of harvest, extreme climate events or economic pressure. During these times it is more important than ever to take care of yourself and focus on eating regularly and getting enough sleep. Depression, the persistent lowering of your mood, which can last for weeks, months or even years, and sometimes without any apparent reason, can often exist alongside stress and anxiety. Depression can interfere with a person’s daily life, making it hard to cope. Understanding and recognising symptoms in ourselves or others is an important step in managing depression. There are many effective ways to treat depression and many individuals go on to lead meaningful and productive lives. By seeking support, it is possible to manage stress levels, get help for depression, and feel more equipped to cope.

If you are struggling with stress, anxiety or depression, a GP can assist you in creating a mental health care plan, or refer you to local supports. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:


Beyond Blue


Online and phone support and information about depression, anxiety, or suicidal thoughts.
P: 1300 22 4636
W: beyondblue.org.au

Suicide Call Back Service

Free support for people affected by suicide.
P: 1300 659 467
W: suicidecallbackservice.org.au

MensLine Australia

Offering support for Australian men, anywhere and anytime.
P: 1300 789 978
W: mensline.org.au

Q Life

Counselling and referral service for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and/or intersex (LGBTI+)
P: 1800 184 527
W: qlife.org.au

Helping Minds

Providing a variety of mental health carer support services.
P: 1800 811 747
W: helpingminds.org.au


OpenArms Veterans and Family Counselling

Mental heath support for current and ex-serving Australian Defence Force personnel and their families.
P: 1800 011 046
W: openarms.gov.au

Men’s Shed WA

Men’s Sheds are located in many local communities in WA, including regional areas. They provide a place where men can get together, share their skills and de-stress. Find your nearest Men’s Shed.
P: 08 6381 5324
W: mensshedswa.org.au

PANDA (perinatal anxiety and depression)

Supporting families to recover from post and antenatal depression and anxiety.
P: 1300 726 306
W: panda.org.au

Rates of domestic and family violence are higher in regional, rural and remote areas. Geographical and social structures in these communities, as well as unique social values and norms, result in specific experiences of domestic and family violence. Domestic and family violence occurs when someone who has a close personal relationship with you makes you feel afraid, powerless or unsafe. It can be physical, but it can also be emotional and psychological. Non-physical forms of abuse can be just as damaging as physical assaults. If you feel disrespected, unable to be yourself, afraid to disagree, or negotiate for what you want, this may be a sign of abuse.

Forms of abuse and violence can include:

  • Physical harm - threats of self/physical harm, smashing things, hurting pets
  • Emotional and psychological abuse -humiliation, put-downs and blaming
  • Financial abuse - strict or unfair control of money
  • Verbal abuse - name-calling, yelling
  • Social abuse - controlling where you go and who you see
  • Sexual abuse - and rape
  • Stalking - following, making excessive phone calls, texts or emails
  • Spiritual or cultural abuse - controlling practices or choice

If you, or someone you know needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:

DV Assist

A non-government agency providing an anonymous, confidential, and free counselling service.
P: 1800 080 083
W: dvassist.org.au

1800 RESPECT


National sexual assault and domestic family violence counselling service.

P: 1800 737 732
W: 1800respect.org.au

Relationships Australia

Offering support services for individuals, families, and communities.

P: 1300 364 277
W: relationships.org.au

Men’s Domestic Violence Helpline


Information and support for men who have experienced family and domestic violence.
P: 1800 000 599

Women’s Domestic Violence Helpline

Information and support for women who have experienced family and domestic violence.
P: 1800 007 339

Sexual Assault Resource Centre (SARC)

Providing a range of free services and telephone advice/support to those who have experienced sexual violence, in both metropolitan Perth and regional WA.
P: 1800 199 888

Elder Abuse Helpline WA

Information and support services for elder Australians.

P: 1300 724 679
W: communities.wa.gov.au/strategies/elder-abuse

Lifeline WA Separated Parents Counselling

Offering free counselling to parents, families and children going through separation, in person or phone/video counselling.
P: 08 9261 4444
W: wa.lifeline.org.au

Share and Care

Sponsors Health, Welfare and Family Services to regional communities.

P: 08 9622 2828
W: shareandcare.com.au

Grief is experienced and expressed in different ways. When someone tragically takes their own life, those left behind, the bereaved, often experience a very complicated form of grief.
Many of these reactions can relate to the person no longer physically being in your life, and some may relate to the fact that the death was by suicide. If you have experienced the suicide of a friend or loved one, it is important to find support. If you, or someone you know, needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit Grief is experienced and expressed in different ways. When someone tragically takes their own life, those left behind, the bereaved, often experience a very complicated form of grief. Many of these reactions can relate to the person no longer physically being in your life, and some may relate to the fact that the death was by suicide. If you have experienced the suicide of a friend or loved one, it is important to find support.

If you, or someone you know, needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit heathdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services. to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services.

Lifeline WA Grief and Bereavement Counselling

Offering free counselling to parents, families and children going through grief and bereavement, in person or phone/video counselling.
P: 08 9261 4444
W: wa.lifeline.org.au

Beyond Blue

Online and phone support, resources, and information.
P: 1300 22 4636
W: beyondblue.org.au


Active Response Bereavement Outreach (ARBOR)

Grief-counselling, practical/emotional support, volunteer lived-experience peer support and support groups for people who have lost loved ones to suicide.
P: 1300 11 44 46
W: anglicarewa.org.au

Griefline (midday - 3am EST)

National helpline offering confidential phone counselling.
P: 1300 845 745

Supporting Someone After a Loss

The immediate aftermath of someone taking their own life can be confusing, painful, and extremely challenging. The ones left behind can feel overwhelmed with feelings of deep sadness, disbelief, and numbness, and can even feel angry at the person for not reaching out for help. It is important to remember that there is no “right way” to grieve, and the best thing you can do to support someone after a loss is to listen without judgement and be there to support them however they may need. Practical support can include offering to notify people of the death, helping with daily tasks (ie. meals and washing), organising the funeral, and not being afraid to invite the bereaved person to talk about the person who has died.

Please note, there are a number of Suicide Prevention Coordinators across Western Australia. You can reach out to find your local contact through:
thinkmentalhealthwa.com.au/thinkmental-health/suicide-preventioncoordinators-and-regions/

Financial stress can occur in many situations and under various circumstances. Some situations that might cause financial stress include losing a job or being retrenched, longterm unemployment, being unable to get full-time work, inability to pay bills or not being able to deal with the increasing costs of living. Worrying about money is not uncommon, however, if it is affecting your physical or emotional health and relationships, it is important to seek help.

If you, or someone you know needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:

Financial Counsellors Association of WA

Free and confidential assistance for those experiencing financial difficulties.
P: 08 9325 1617

National Debt Helpline

Free and confidential financial counselling.
P: 1800 007 007
W: ndh.org.au

Rural West

Providing a free and confidential counselling service to regional small businesses and all primary production enterprises in WA, who are navigating their way through difficult and turbulent times.
P: 1800 612 004
W: ruralwest.com.au

Financial Counsellor’s Helpline

Confidential support for Western Australians experiencing financial problems.
P: 1800 007 007
W: financialcounsellors.org

Gambling Help Online

Private and confidential support for anyone affected by gambling.
P: 1800 858 858
W: gamblinghelponline.org.au

Gambling Help WA
Centrecare’s free service and information for people affected by problem gambling.
P: 08 9325 6644
W: centrecare.com.au/rural-services/gambling-help-services

Narrogin Financial Counselling Services

Assists individuals and families experiencing financial crisis to address their financial situation through the provision of counselling- advocacy- referral and the Hardship Utility Grant Scheme(HUGS).
P: (08) 9881 1363
W: yacwa.org.au

Substance misuse is the harmful use of substances (like drugs and alcohol) for non-medical purposes. Often associated with the use of illicit drugs, legal substances can also be misused, such as alcohol, prescription or over-the-counter medication, caffeine, nicotine and volatile substances (e.g. petrol, glue, paint).

Addiction is a physical and/or psychological need for a substance, due to regular, continued use. Some substances are highly addictive, others are less addictive. However, the symptoms of addiction are similar no matter which substance is used.

If you, or someone you know needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:

Alcohol and Drug Support Line

A confidential and non-judgemental telephone counselling, information, and referral service for anyone seeking help for their own or another person’s alcohol or drug use.
P: 1800 198 024 (Regional) or 08 9442 5000 (Metro)

Parent and Family Drug Support Line

A service offering telephone counselling, information and referrals to parents and family members of people that use alcohol and other drugs.
P: 1800 653 203 (Regional) or 08 9442 5050 (Metro)

Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Service

Counselling and referral support for Aboriginal people with drug related issues.
P: 08 9221 1411

Holyoake

Counselling and support for people struggling with drug and alcohol problems.
P: 1800 447 172
W: holyoake.org.au

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Self-help groups with meetings all over Western Australia.
P: 1300 222 222
W: aaperthwa.org

Narcotics Anonymous (NA)

Self-help groups with meetings all over Western Australia.
P: 1300 652 820
W: na.org.au

Challenges, difficulties, and mental health concerns do not discriminate based on age. These issues affect us all. For younger people there can often be barriers to seeking support including feelings of isolation, not feeling understood or the gravity of their concerns being dismissed, not knowing where or how to seek support, and not knowing who to speak to. Having a safe space to express worries, feelings and concerns can be beneficial to work through difficulties, increase connectedness and confidence and feel heard. Opening up can also reduce anxiety, build confidence, and foster strong communities for both youth and young adults.

If you, or a young person you know, needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:

Youth Focus

Offering free face-to-face counselling and education programs aimed at building long-term wellbeing for young people.
P: 08 6266 4333
W: youthfocus.com.au

Children and Young People Responsive Suicide Support (CYPRESS)

A free and long-term support service for children and young people between the ages of 6 and 18 years who have been bereaved by suicide.
P: 1300 114 446
W: cypress.org.au

Youthbeyondblue

Support for young people experiencing anxiety and depression (12-25 year olds).
P: 1300 224 636
W: beyondblue.org.au/who-does-it-affect/young-people

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Support

Support, advice and treatment for young people and their families who are experiencing mental health issues.
P: 08 6456 2222
W: cahs.health.wa.gov.au

headspace

Information and services for 12-25 year olds and their families, including online support.
P: 1800 650 890
W: headspace.org.au

Kids Helpline

Free, confidential 24-hour phone, email and web counselling.
P: 1800 551 800
W: kidshelpline.com.au

20Talk

Facilitating open nights and interactive gigs for young adults, encouraging them to talk about mental health.
W: 20talk.com.au

ReachOut Australia

Helps under 25s with everyday questions through to tough times.
W: ReachOut.com

In Australia, and other parts of the world, the acronym LGBTIQ+ attempts to capture diversity and stands for lesbian, gay, bisexuality, trans, gender diverse, non-binary, intersex, and queer peoples. The ‘+’ stands for all other sexualities, sexes, and genders that are not captured within these letters. LGBTIQ+ people may experience discrimination, harassment, and hostility in many parts of their everyday life – in their places of work and education, when accessing health or other services. Issues impacting people who identify as LGBTIQ+ can be complex and varying, unique to everyone. As such, the experience, response, and impact for each individual will differ from person to person.

If you, or someone you know needs support, speak to a GP or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services:

Living Proud

Providing support to Western Australia’s gay, lesbian, trans and intersex community.
P: 08 9486 9855
W: livingproud.org.au

P Flag

Supporting people in Western Australia by helping families and friends understand and support their LGBTI loved ones with knowledge, acceptance, love and pride.
P: 0404 594 699
W: pflagwa.org.au

Q Life

A counselling and referral service for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and/or intersex (LGBTI+).
T: 1800 184 527
W: qlife.org.au

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, good health is often about physical, emotional, social, cultural, and spiritual wellbeing, for both the individual and the community. Tragically the rates of depression and suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are high and there are some unique factors that have an impact on the social and emotional wellbeing
of this community.

If you, or someone you know needs support, speak to a GP, or seek further help. Visit healthdirect.gov.au to find a local GP, or reach out to one of the following support services.

Wungening Aboriginal Corporation

Empowering Aboriginal peoples to reconnect with their mind, body, spirit and community.
W: wungening.com.au

Derbal Yerrigan Health Service

Providing a range of health services to Aboriginal peoples within Perth metropolitan region.
P: 08 9421 3888
W: dyhs.org.au

Moorditj Youth

An initiative led by local Noongar youth. This mentoring and leadership program is aimed at reaching high risk youth aged between 6 and 25 years.
P: 0402 492 886

Indigenous Psychological Services

Providing Aboriginal mental health training, suicide intervention programs, and psychological tests for Aboriginal peoples.
P: 08 9362 2036
W: indigenouspsychservices.com.au

Relationships Australia -
Moorditj Yarning

An Aboriginal specific program of Relationships Australia WA. Services include counselling; yarning around a broad range of issues, and other programs that the Aboriginal community identify as useful: women’s art and craft groups, children’s traditional and contemporary dance and men’s group.
P: 1300 364 277
W: relationshipswa.org.au/services/aboriginal-community-support/moorditjyarning

MindSpot Indigenous Wellbeing Course

Designed to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults aged 18 years and over to learn to manage mild, moderate, and severe symptoms of depression and anxiety.
P: 1800 61 44 34
W: mindspot.org.au/indigenous-wellbeing

South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

A Noongar Community Controlled Health Organisation, founded on the principles of self determination, empowerment and freedom of choice.
P: (08) 9726 6000
W: swams.com.au

Southern Aboriginal Corporation

Provides effective representation and resource delivery for Indigenous people on issues of health, housing, recreation, employment, education and training whilst promoting Noongar social and cultural values in the Great Southern and South-West regions of Western Australia.
P: (08) 9842 7777
W: sacorp.com.au

As One Nyitting

Has been working with young people and families on Ngoongar Country in metropolitan Perth and the Wheatbelt region since 2015.
P:  0400 928 147
W: asonenyitting.com

Keedac

Kaata-Koorliny Employment & Enterprise Development Aboriginal Corporation. 
W: keedac.com

Around 4.3 million people in Australia are living with a disability. People with disabilities, just like everyone else, have aspirations, abilities, and contributions to make to their local communities. They experience the usual ups and downs of life and, for some people, living with a disability may impact their mental health and
wellbeing.

Carers are people who provide care and support to family members and friends who have a disability, mental illness, or a chronic condition. There are over 2.7 million people who are caring for others in Australia. As a result of this help and support, carers can also experience impacts to their own wellbeing.

If you are someone living with a disability, or a carer of someone with a disability, it is important to know that there is support available to you, to help you navigate the challenges unique to your experiences.

CarersWA

Supporting carers in Western Australia.
P: 1300 227 377
W: carerswa.asn.au

Disability Services, WA Department of Communities

Providing a range of direct services offering support, information and resources to people with disability, their families and carers.
P: 08 6217 6888 or 1800 176 888 (freecall)
W: disability.wa.gov.au

Autism Association of WA

Information and support for people with autism and their families.
P: 08 9489 8900
W: autism.org.au

People with Disability WA

Advocating for the rights of people with disabilities.
P: 1800 193 331
W: pwdwa.org.au

SECCA Sexuality, Education, Counselling and Consultancy Agency

SECCA supports people with disability to learn about relationships, sexuality and sexual health.
T: 08 9420 7226
W: secca.org.au

Carer Gateway

An Australia-wide network of Carer Gateway service providers. They will talk through what you need and help you to find local services and support to help you.
T: 1800 422 737
W: carergateway.gov.au

If you are in crisis or need to speak to someone, please call Lifeline WA on 13 11 14.
If your life is in immediate danger, please call 000.